Opaeula.co.uk

A dedicated forum and online store for the Opae ula shrimp! 

■ Our Opae ula shrimp web store is now open! We are selling Opae ula Shrimp and Macroalgae via our eBay store HERE
Share photos/videos, journals and logs for your Opae ula tank setups for others to read.
 #5510  by odin
 24 Oct 2018 15:03
Yeah the salt water master test kit works fine on brackish water, is either do a water change with fresh brackish water or add some biodigest.


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 #5527  by Algae In Space
 25 Oct 2018 19:31
Vorteil wrote: 10 Oct 2018 20:06 It could be the cause of the amonia spike. Looks like the tank is cycling. The sand is geeting a hint of brown to it. The marimo ball there. Is it supposed to look or get that way. Looks like there's hair algae starting to form all over? If the marimo is not a true brackish ball I would not keep it in there. As far as the amonia I would not worry about it. The opae are really hardy.

Where is the difference between a true marimo ball and a fake one? Mine look exactly like true marimo balls but how can I be sure. And what if they are not? I bought mine at the local pet shrimp store. I noticed some hair like things clinging to the marimos too. What if it's hair algae? How bas is that?

Is Biodigest way better than microbe lift special blend?

Keeping Opae Ula is easy they said.There is not much you have to do and think about they said...
 #5535  by Vorteil
 26 Oct 2018 00:07
If you stick to the basics in keeping Opae I think it's extremely easy. Basics meaning the following:
    1. Lava rocks only. No substrate i.e. sand
      2. No feeding. If you do feed only at the begining in order to get the tank going. Since the waste from the Opae feeds the algae you do need to get that going. If you feed use freeze dried spirulina.
        3. Keep your temperature constant. Not too much fluctuation.

        This is pretty basic. This is an exact example of my jars. Lava rock, no substrate, no feeding, and they are breeding. At one point in time I did feed my tanks once a week. I do not at all anymore. Temperatures in the summer does fluctuate too much and gets into the upper 80 degrees which seems too high for the Opae to breed. Winter time the temps are in the mid to lower 70's. Keep it simple.
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         #5541  by Algae In Space
         26 Oct 2018 11:40
        Vorteil wrote: 26 Oct 2018 00:07 If you stick to the basics in keeping Opae I think it's extremely easy. Basics meaning the following:
          1. Lava rocks only. No substrate i.e. sand
            2. No feeding. If you do feed only at the begining in order to get the tank going. Since the waste from the Opae feeds the algae you do need to get that going. If you feed use freeze dried spirulina.
              3. Keep your temperature constant. Not too much fluctuation.

              This is pretty basic. This is an exact example of my jars. Lava rock, no substrate, no feeding, and they are breeding. At one point in time I did feed my tanks once a week. I do not at all anymore. Temperatures in the summer does fluctuate too much and gets into the upper 80 degrees which seems too high for the Opae to breed. Winter time the temps are in the mid to lower 70's. Keep it simple.

              I see! And this makes sense!! I just felt that my Opaes need a little green. And if you have a look at the habitats of Hawaii you see al sorts of green in there. Algae and also "real" plants. I wanted to order the Ruppia maritima. It grows in many pools there but they are not for sale. So I ordered Microsorum pteropus. It hasn't arrived but do well in a brackish aquarium. Thats the last plant I will try! If all goes to hell I will have to start all over again.

              The temperatures make sense!

              I never fed except 2 times when I just wanted to see if they would eat a grain of rice or a piece of seaweed. The strange thing is: mine don't really eat spirulina. It's true! They prefer the biofilm. They try it but are pretty uninterested after a short while.
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